Medicinal Plants You Can Grow in Your Garden

April 27, 2018

Medicinal plants can sometimes sound like a scary thing but these easy to find and grow plants all have wonderful health benefits. Always remember that you should start out with small doses of anything new so that you know how you tolerate it. It’s also important to know exactly where you’re getting these from. You want to make sure that they have never been sprayed with chemicals since you’ll be eating them.

Raspberry Leaf- We all love raspberries, but did you know the raspberry leaf has health benefits as well? It has high levels of potassium, iron, and various vitamins like C, B, and E. Its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties can help with digestion, lower blood pressure, and soothes skin conditions like acne. It can also provide a relaxing feeling.

Raspberry Shortcake Raspberry (Rubus idaeus `Raspberry Shortcake`) Photo Courtesy of Monrovia

Raspberry Shortcake Raspberry (Rubus idaeus `Raspberry Shortcake`) Photo Courtesy of Monrovia

Echinacea- this is a commonly known medicinal plant, but it really packs a punch. Not only is it gorgeous in the garden, it can help boost your immune system and help with various illnesses and infections. It’s popular as a tea and it can also be found in oils and vitamins.

Echinacea

Echinacea

Hibiscus- when made into tea, Hibiscus flowers have been used to treat sore throats and help lower blood pressure. Once the flowers have fallen off, you can snap off the sepals which are used to make tea. Dry them out, and then you can make hibiscus tea!

Midnight Marvel Mallow (Hibiscus x 'Midnight Marvel')

Midnight Marvel Mallow (Hibiscus x ‘Midnight Marvel’)

Dandelions- since dandelions are such a common yard and garden weed, most people just mow them over or pull them at the first chance they get. But, that small yellow flower has quite a few health benefits which include easing muscle/joint pain, good for bone health, and it promotes liver and kidney health.

Pot Marigold- also known as calendula, pot marigold has been used in teas, topical treatments, and other various forms for centuries. Pot marigold can help treat different kinds of skin conditions such as rashes, sunburns, and allergies and some infections like ear and fungal infections. As a bonus, marigolds can also help deter pests in the garden.

Pot Marigold (Calendula) Photo Courtesy of Gardener's Path

Pot Marigold (Calendula) Photo Courtesy of Gardener’s Path

Have you added in any of these medicinal plants to your garden? Which is your favorite? Let us know in the comments, we’d love to hear from you!

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